Who shot rock and roll book

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who shot rock and roll book

Gail Buckland | Who Shot Rock & Roll | Photography Books For Sale

Bob Dylan walking down snowy Jones Street arm in arm with Suze Rotolo; John, Paul, George and Pete and Stu perched on a rusty steel wagon in Hamburg; Janis Joplin going at full tilt — these images are as familiar to many of us as the face in the mirror. Buckland examined the archives of a hundred photographers to choose the work in this book, which also functions as a catalog of a show by the same name now at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, running through Jan. Although there are more or less contemporary shots of Amy Winehouse and M. Leafing through the book or walking around the exhibition is delightful. Withers, of Ike Turner keeping a close eye on Tina during a performance at a Memphis club in The arrangement of pictures seems more or less random. The book starts off with an essay, and each image comes with a biography of the photographer and occasionally a discussion of when and how the picture was made.
File Name: who shot rock and roll book.zip
Size: 14007 Kb
Published 10.01.2019

Who Shot Rock & Roll Teaser Trailer

I bought mine copy of this excellent book last year at the famous music photography gallery Morrison Hotel Gallery when I was visiting New York, but got back to it again just last week, as some flu tied me to my bed. I know, crazy, but with the frantic life rhythm these days, I can't seem to get all of the things I want just in time. But, better late than never, right?

Who Shot Rock and Roll: A Photographic History, 1955-Present

This is the the first book to explore the photographs and the photographers who captured rock's message of freedom and personal reinvention and to examine the effect of their pictures on the musicians, the fans, and the culture itself. The only music photographers whose names are well known are those who themselves have become celebrities. But many of the images that have shaped our consciousness and desire were made by photographers whose names are unfamiliar. For the first time, the work of these talented men and women is brought into the pantheon; we see the musicians they photographed and how the images gave rock and roll its visual identity. To bring together these images, Gail Buckland, acclaimed photographic editor looked through the archives of one hundred photographers, selecting pictures not on the basis of the usual suspects, but on the power of the images themselves, Buckland writes about the photographers, their influences, their relationships with their subjects, how they took the images, how they saw what they saw and captured what they captured: the spirit and essence of rock. Artists All artists New arrivals Music genres Music eras. All photographers Featured photographers Graphic artists.

A Photographic History, 1955-Present

Who Shot Rock and Roll Photography Exhibit (Brooklyn Museum of Art)

The exhibit was organized by guest curator Gail Buckland at the Brooklyn Museum in The exhibit was a collaboration between Gail Buckland and the Brooklyn Museum, which began after the museum learned that Buckland was writing a book focusing on the photographers behind iconic rock-and-roll photographs. The book serves as the catalogue to this landmark exhibition. The exhibition is in six sections: behind the scenes; career beginnings; live performances; crowds and fans; portraits; images and album covers. Blondie played the opening party on October 29,

Look Inside. Oct 20, ISBN The only music photographers whose names are well known are those who themselves have become celebrities. But many of the images that have shaped our consciousness and desire were made by photographers whose names are unfamiliar. Here are Elvis in —not yet mythic but beautiful, tender, vulnerable, sexy, photographed by Alfred Wertheimer. Jimi Hendrix, by Gered Mankowitz, a photograph that became a poster and was hung on the walls of millions of bedrooms and college dorms.

1 COMMENTS

  1. Raymi L. says:

    'Who Shot Rock and Roll,' by Gail Buckland - The New York Times

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